The link between ACL injuries, joint stability, and neuromuscular control

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The link between ACL injuries, joint stability, and neuromuscular control

 

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common debilitating knee injury in active adults. Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) causes loss of mechanical knee joint stability and sensory feedback, which dramatically affects the function of the knee. The injury causes knee instability, reduced mobility and leads to knee osteoarthritis (OA). The incidence of ACL injury is much higher in females, and females also have a higher incidence of knee OA. The common factor between ACL injury and knee OA is knee instability, and the muscles surrounding the joint are the only dynamic regulators of this stability. By investigating the contributions of lower limb muscles to knee stability we can identify activation patterns that may improve functional stability at the joint and help these populations.

This international collaboration between researchers at the University of Ottawa, the Ottawa Hospital, University of Copenhagen and the Bispebjerg University Hospital will answer the following research questions: (1) how do individual muscle activations at the knee modulate knee joint stability and cartilage loading in males and females? (2) How does ACL injury alter individual muscle activations at the knee and thus modulate knee joint stability and cartilage loading in males and females?

Using multi-disciplinary research to bridge the gap from theory into practice in the rehabilitation sciences